Everything You Need To Know Before, During & After ACL Reconstruction

Everything You Need To Know Before, During & After ACL Reconstruction

Everything You Need To Know Before, During & After ACL Reconstruction This week Jennactive has been featured in Episode 101 of the Heads ‘N Tales Podcast! To learn a more personal insight on my ACL journey and expert tips regarding surgery and recovery tune into to Episode 101! http://jennactive.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/812ea880-c28f-11e7-82dd-bd988554f1b7.mp4 Don’t forget to Pre – Order your Copy of Surviving 7: The Expert’s Guide to ACL Surgery today before prices go up after launch date of December 1! This book will not only reveal my personal journey but teach you how I have learned to survive and conquer all of these surgeries! This is your expert guide to having the most successful ACL surgery...
Knee Probs: Being Prepared to Travel

Knee Probs: Being Prepared to Travel

Knee Probs: Being Prepared to Travel   Traveling is always a hard process for me. Sitting too much, standing too much, and getting out of my routine usually cause my knees a lot of pain and swelling. I’ve found through experience that having a go to travel kit for knee pain helps these symptoms dramatically, especially if you are traveling after your injury or surgery. There are many items that can help you but here are some suggestions of the products I like to use. My travel knee kit includes: Hyperice sleeve for easy ice and compression on the go Mobility Wod Gemini tool for rolling my tight quads or back muscles from traveling and overuse Acetaminophen, Vitamin C, and Turmeric for pain, inflammation, and swelling A basic muscle stick for rolling tight calves, quads, and IT bands A Knee sleeve for swelling an easy on the go barrier between the ice and my skin Marc Pro my travel E Stem unit to help with pain, swelling, and maintaining muscle controlling during rehabilitation   Tips for traveling with knee injury: Plan out your knee travel kit and use it whenever able to. Make sure you wear supportive footwear. Take time to rest your knee. Plan out rest time. Make compromises on your events because of your recovery. This is hard to do but important part in your recovery process. Overdoing it could cause you a setback. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or cancel your plans if need be. Be honest with your travel guests or hosts on the condition of your knee and how much it will...

How to be a Crutch Master

How to be a Crutch Master Mastering crutches makes a major difference in your frustration regarding ACL recovery.  Depending on the invasiveness of the surgery, you will be on crutches anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks. You aren’t going to be able to do much of anything after your surgery, but if you have a hard time on crutches, too, then you are going to be in a whole lot of trouble, mentally and physically. There is an art to crutching. After using crutches for all 7 of my surgeries, I am the crutch master. I used to race kids in my high school down the hall ways; no one could believe how fast I was. I could crutch forwards, backwards, and side to side. This helped tremendously, navigating the halls of high school and the narrow pathways between desks in the classroom and isles on the school bus. I crutched with ease except for when I slipped on a water spill and fell on my butt in front of the whole high school as a freshman. The entire hallway full of people froze and just stared at me, sitting there on the ground. I’m not sure if they wanted to laugh or wanted to check on me, but no one moved and no one said a word. I couldn’t get back up because my knee was too immobile and finally a big senior football player walked over and picked me up, handed me each of my crutches and walked away in silence. I was too nervous to thank him at the time, but his gesture was one I...
Stay Slow: Why Safe ACL Rehab Progressions are Essential

Stay Slow: Why Safe ACL Rehab Progressions are Essential

Stay Slow: Why Safe ACL Rehab Progression are Essential The first 2 months after ACL surgery are the most important regarding the function, range of motion, and longevity of your knee. Many people try to rush their recovery and ditch their crutches too soon or attempt to do too much on their knee too soon. This is something you should take very seriously because in an ACL reconstruction a surgeon uses a new graft from one of your tendons or from a donor tissue, and uses it to create your new ACL. At first, this tissue is new and has not adhered to your body. Overdoing it after ACL surgery creates the possibility for this new graft to stretch out and not heal appropriately. Another concern with progressing yourself too quickly is increased swelling. Swelling is one of the main reasons for muscle weakness and atrophy after surgery, and increased swelling can lead to decreased range of motion and mobility. In the first 2 months after ACL surgery, the biggest priority is gaining full extension (or straightening ability) at the knee and keeping the swelling down. If those 2 simple things are not accomplished then it will be difficult to gain strength and function, and you will be more prone to scar tissue and arthritic problems in the knee long term. As a young high school athlete, eager to return to sport, it was very hard for me to stay slow during the process of rehabilitation and take my time. My athletic mindset drove me to want to conquer all obstacles quickly and race through my rehabilitation, but it...